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Art - Cattelan the Perspectivist

March 24, 2017

Cattelan the Perspectivist

Multi-media sculptor Maurizio Cattelan is known for his conceptual prank art. He has taken things out of galleries instead of putting them in, dug holes in museum floors, used guards as pedalling exhibits and taped his Italian art dealer to the wall so he could merchandize himself... read more >

 

Jason McLean, Art

September 23, 2016

Art
Jason McLean,

Brooklyn based Canadian artist, Jason McLean, creates autobiographical imagery, through scavenged objects, and memory mapping. Jason McLean’s diverse art practice includes sculpture, sound works, zines, book works, mixed-media installations, correspondence art, curatorial explorations, puppets, and performance, but he is probably best known for his diaristic mapping and surreal drawings... read more >

 

Moray Hillary, Pre-New Reflective By Heather Zises

July 27, 2016

Moray Hillary,
Pre-New Reflective
By Heather Zises

Currently on view at Galrie Protégé is Pre-New Reflective, a series of haunting faceless portraits and sculptural assemblages by Scottish painter Moray Hillary. Curated by Alison Pierz, the exhibition explores the artist’s personal obsession with the concept of entropy, the fragile decline of youth into old age, and themes of impermanence... read more >

 

FILM - Cameraperson, dir. Kristen Johnson: stories from behind the camera lens

May 28, 2016

Art Cameraperson,
dir. Kristen Johnson: stories from behind the camera lens
Review by Anya Prokhorkina

Have you ever wondered how do they film those stories that you see in the thought-provoking documentaries that deal with the complexities of the today’s world? What happens to the person behind the camera standing out there under the bullets? Kirsten Johnson shares her experience in personal essay film Cameraperson. read more >

 

FILM - SELFISH - Review by Heather Zises

April 7, 2016

Art SELFISH
Review by Heather Zises

“With this show, I very much wanted to inspire introspection in other people. SELFISH is really about the existential significance of self-portraiture. This show is not meant to be a spectacle. At its core, it is more of an exercise piece where the viewer looks at the art on the walls and then starts to look within themselves.” - Akeem Duncan, SELFISH Curator... read more >

 

Winter Realm Series

February 11, 2016

Art Feature
Winter Realm Series
by Noah Becker

2005-2010
Oil on Canvas

<< See more >>

 

Paul Rousso at Lanoue Fine Art

December 5, 2015

Art
Paul Rousso at Lanoue Fine Art

Review by Sam Nickerson

Only, Rousso's work is not a typical heirloom. It's usually trash – discarded candy wrappers from days gone by, newspapers that become artifacts a day later – or other bits of an analog culture that is quickly disappearing into the past... read more >

 

Strange Days directed by Kathryn Bigelow (1995) by Raqi Syed

August 06, 2015

Film
The Revolution Will Be Projected into Our Cerebral Cortex:
Strange Days and Imagining VR

Strange Days directed by Kathryn Bigelow (1995)

Reviewed by Raqi Syed

Young men routinely pulled over by the police for driving while black. Racially conscious rap artists lauded by ordinary citizens as cultural bards, and decried by local city governments as fomenters of hate... read more >

 

Airan Kang, The Luminous Poem at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery

July 31, 2015

Art
Airan Kang,
The Luminous Poem at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery

Reviewed by Heather Zises

On view at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery is South Korean artist Airan Kang’s most recent body of work, The Luminous Poem. Known for her metaphysical approach to text, Kang creates electronically luminescent sculptures cast from transparent synthetic resin and LED paintings in the form of books and scrolls... read more >

 

Damien Hoar De Galvan at Carroll and Sons

July 23, 2015

Damien Hoar De Galvan at Carroll and Sons

Review by Sam Nickerson

The sculptures of ‘Wake Up,’ Damien Hoar de Galvan’s first solo show at Carroll and Sons, emphasize process over results.

The whimsical, colorful oblongs – mostly constructed on thin wooden strips – make for a breezy, light summer show... read more >

 

ANTIGONE, 2015, directed by IVO VAN HOVE

June 25, 2015

Theather
ANTIGONE, 2015,
directed by IVO VAN HOVE
Seen at Théâtre de la Ville, Paris, Fr

Reviewed by Katia Zoritch

One fine Thursday evening, I left Théâtre de la Ville and started walking towards Jardin du Luxembourg in order to catch my train home. An hour and 45 minutes of the play’s length into the evening, and everything had already changed in the dark gloss of the lampposts... read more >

 

World of Tomorrow and the Quit-Bang Language of the Future

June 11, 2015

Film
World of Tomorrow and the Quit-Bang Language of the Future
Directed by Don Hertzfeldt, 2015

Review by Raqi Syed

I came of age with the internet. In 1994, I opened my first email account and used a unix based client called Pine to read it. With Pine I learned about not just the first inklings of a kind of anxiety-reward based system of behavior we now call social media, but also the language that is so specific to it...
read more >

 

Karen Jerzyk's unsettling Parallel World at Art Block Gallery

May 21, 2015

Karen Jerzyk's unsettling Parallel World
at Art Block Gallery
by Sam Nickerson

In place of words, dilapidated buildings and delicate, gaunt figures form the vocabulary of photographer Karen Jerzyk's Parellel World.
Jerzyk admits to struggling to express herself verbally, especially in relation to family tragedy, and instead relies on the nightmarish tableaux that make up the show to say what words cannot. The 22 works on view at Gallery @ Art Block... read more >

 

Quintet - Directed by Robert Altman, 1979

May 15, 2015

Quintet
Directed by Robert Altman, 1979

If winter did indeed come, and all the Five Kingdoms exhausted their power by killing each other and succumbing to a cold front that never left, you’d end up with a barren post global-cooling world in which the lords and ladies of House Lannister were reduced to playing some pitiful board game that is really a metaphor for the art of war and the existential dread of living... read more >

 

Classic Movie Short Review: Croupier (1998)

May 07, 2015

Classic Movie Short Review:
Croupier (1998)

Review by Emily Stewart

Jack is a fledgling writer whose career is at a standstill. Forced to take a job outside his area of expertise, he accepted a post as a casino croupier. Jack thought that being a croupier would only mean long, tedious hours of work ahead of him. However, little did he know that his job would allow him to gather the materials he needed to write a best-selling book... read more >

 

CEK Concrete Functional Sculptures

May 07, 2015

CEK
Concrete Functional Sculptures

CEK is not easily confined to one label. The Italian-born transplant to Toronto fuses many disciplines – design, architecture, art – into an equally unpredictable medium, poured concrete. His opening reception, April 23 at Goodfellas Gallery in Toronto, is the result of two years’ experimentation in molded and cast concrete sculptural forms... read more >

 

Popeye - Directed by Robert Altman

April 02, 2015

Film
Popeye
Directed by Robert Altman, 1980
Reviewed by Raqi Syed

The first thing I learned in film school was this: when introducing yourself in class, name your road to Damascus; the film that started it all for you. Acceptable answers are Star Wars, Jaws, Breathless, Persona. Any Truffaut film would do, and the second [or fifth] Star Wars... read more >

 

ALEXIS DAHAN, ALARM! AT TWO RAMS,FEBRUARY 5-22, 2015

March 05, 2015

ALEXIS DAHAN,
ALARM! AT TWO RAMS,
FEBRUARY 5-22, 2015
by Heather Zises

Currently on view at Two Rams is a conceptual playground of art and space called Alarm! Conceived of by Alexis Dahan, the immersive exhibition continues the Parisian artist’s investigation of city streets as a source for visual experimentations, a location for public art interventions and a place to disseminate philosophical content... read more >

 

3 Women - Directed by Robert Altman, 1977

February 05, 2015

Film
3 Women
Directed by Robert Altman, 1977

There has been much discussion about how 3 Women is a film that came entirely to Robert Altman as a dream. The result is meant to be what he transcribed of it. The film certainly has a subversive, incoherent quality that many films of the ‘70s possess... read more >

 

Do Ho Suh - Drawings, at Lehmann Maupin by Heather Zises

January 23, 2015

Do Ho Suh
Drawings, at Lehmann Maupin
September 11-October 25, 2014
by Heather Zises

Known for his elegant sculptural installations that are volumetric shells of his past homes, Korean artist Do Ho Suh creates exquisitely detailed portraits of spaces in a variety of media... read more >

 

Kingdom of Dreams and Madness

January 15, 2015

Film
Kingdom of Dreams and Madness
Directed by Mami Sunada, 2013
by Raqi Syed

Hand drawn films are a dying art. Perhaps even dead already. The industry attitude towards these films is that they represent a high watermark in artistry, but are painstakingly slow and expensive to make... read more >

 

Nir Hod, Once Everything Was Much Better Even the Future

January 08, 2015

Art
Nir Hod, Once Everything Was Much Better Even the Future
September 11-October 25 2014 at Paul Kasmin
by Heather Zises

Israeli artist Nir Hod is known for creating artworks that explore relationships between glamour and loneliness, beauty and death. As a painter, Hod’s palette ranges from the old master portraits of Peter Paul Rubens to the photo-realist technique of Gerhard Richter... read more >

 

Reuven Israel, Multipolarity

December 04, 2014

Art
Reuven Israel, Multipolarity
Fridman Gallery
by Heather Zises
Photos Courtesy of the Fridman Gallery

It used to be the case that parody was the final signifier by which a genre had become so ubiquitous, its conventions so overplayed, that the only way in which the genre could continue on for another cycle was to spiral in on itself... read more >

 

Boyhood

November 06, 2014

Film Review
Boyhood
Directed by Richard Linklater, 2014

by Raqi Syed

In an interview with NPR discussing the genesis of his film Boyhood, Richard Linklater mentions that when he began to think about the story, he imagined writing it as a novel, even an experimental novel... read more >

 

Exhibition Review: Mario Schifano 1960 – 67

October 17, 2014

Exhibition Review: Mario Schifano 1960 – 67
Luxembourg & Dayan
27 June–16 August 2014

by Owen Duffy

It used to be the case that parody was the final signifier by which a genre had become so ubiquitous, its conventions so overplayed, that the only way in which the genre could continue on for another cycle was to spiral in on itself... read more >

 

Subverting the Realist Impulse in the Work of Shauna Born

October 9, 2014

Subverting the Realist Impulse in the Work of Shauna Born

by Robert Anderson

Shauna Born’s latest series of drawings, Christopher Sunset, opened at Kartharine Mulherin Contemporary Art Projects. Approaching the gallery, it’s hard to believe Toronto’s West Queen West was once a derelict district dominated by a sprawling, archaic mental institution... read more >

 

Linder: Femme/Objet

September 25, 2014

Linder: Femme/Objet

by Erik Martiny

The circular structure of the exhibition space accommodating this retrospective of Sterling Linder’s work is perfectly suited to her unwavering interest in collage over the last thirty years: from the first scalpel-cut, hand-assembled images of the seventies to her more recent Photoshop-assisted photomontages... read more >

 

What We Do in the Shadows

September 11, 2014

Film
What We Do in the Shadows
directed by Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi, 2014

by Raqi Syed

It used to be the case that parody was the final signifier by which a genre had become so ubiquitous, its conventions so overplayed, that the only way in which the genre could continue on for another cycle was to spiral in on itself... read more >

 

Kara Walker, A Subtlety, Domino Sugar Factory, Williamsburg, Summer 2014

August 28, 2014

Kara Walker, A Subtlety,
Domino Sugar Factory, Williamsburg, Summer 2014

by Heather Zises

Kara Walker is a contemporary African American artist whose work is fraught and intersected with issues of race, gender, identity, and sexual politics. She is best known for her panoramic friezes of black, cut-paper silhouettes set against white grounds that pungently address the history of slavery and racism... read more >

Justin Kimball at Carroll and Sons

August 1st, 2014

Justin Kimball at Carroll and Sons

by Sam Nickerson

When photographer Justin Kimball was a child, his family did what countless other American families did during the twentieth century; they hopped into a van and drove around the country, joining the crowds at National parks and beaches, watering holes and other sites of leisure and recreation designated to the general public... read more >

 

Kay Rosen: Blingo

June 27, 2014

Kay Rosen: Blingo

by Heather Zises

Renowned for her text-based works, American artist Kay Rosen uses language as her primary material and subject for her paintings, drawings, editions, and installations. By playing with different approaches to typography and layout, format and scale, space and color, Rosen’s compositions explore the many avenues of language and how it can be represented visually. While a proclivity for puns and vernacular wit allude to the artist’s background in language and linguistics, the adroit use of words as objects and icons reinforces Rosen’s role as an artist who has mastered the interplay between visual and verbal realms... read more >

 

The Cup in the Art of Samuel Bak

May 29, 2014

Told & Foretold: The Cup in the Art of Samuel Bak, at Pucker Gallery

by Samantha Burgoon

In a 2008 interview, Samuel Bak explained his connection to the maxim: a miserable childhood is a writer’s goldmine (1). That statement certainly holds true for the painter and Holocaust survivor, who, by the end of World War II, had experienced countless atrocities, and who, aside from his mother, was the only surviving member of his once-large family... read more >

 

Collective Memory Manipulated: Sara Cwynar’s Flat Death

May 23, 2014

Collective Memory Manipulated: Sara Cwynar’s Flat Death

by Caroline Hayward

Flat Death is the latest iteration of an ongoing project by artist and photographer Sara Cwynar. Through a process that encompasses collage, photography, sculpture and digital alteration, she obsessively manipulates found photos and objects to create works that confront the image as an influential object in contemporary society... read more >

 

The Universal Archive

May 08, 2014

Letinsky’s Creases Turn Sour by Sam Nickerson

by Sam Nickerson

The photographs can trick you. At first glance you're seeing a pile of litter on a table. It's only when the photographs are viewed up close that the messes are revealed to be neatly arranged collections of random items: cups, ribbons, a slice of toast, a pepper. Still, the items seem incongruous, they're not actual cups and ribbons, but clipped photos of said items organized in familiar ways... read more >

 

The Universal Archive

April 24, 2014

The Universal Archive by by Sam Nickerson

by Sam Nickerson

William Kentridge’s “Universal Archive” presents typewriters in all shapes, sizes, and levels of tangibility, but is no technical study of the machine. The works are, however, a record of masterful printmaking techniques and a reminder of the fluidity of fact.

The eight typewriters on view at Barbara Krakow Gallery—which has worked with the South African artist since 1999—form a small and quiet show... read more >

 

Accumulation: Sculptural work by Alben at Gallery Nines  - Caroline Hayward

April 17, 2014

Accumulation: Sculptural work by Alben at Gallery Nines

by Caroline Hayward

Visitors to French artist Alben’s latest solo show at Gallery Nine5 on Spring Street in New York City are greeted with a half-life-sized standing figure of former Chinese dictator Mao Zedong. The sculpture is rendered in clear resin and filled with sharp edged, broken pieces of blue and white pottery... read more >

 

Paris Street Art

March 20, 2014

Paris Street Art
Musée de la Poste

by Erik Martiny

Philip Larkin once said that desolation was to him what daffodils were to Wordsworth. Interviewed for the current exhibition at the Musée de la Poste in Paris, French Street artist Reroalso remarked that he finds “the energy that derelict places radiate inspiring.” This fascination with the beauty of urban wasteland has been vivifyingly enhanced by the Musée de la Poste for its current exhibition... read more >

 

Trellises by Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, gallery nine5 by Allan M. Jalon

February 14, 2014

Trellises by Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann
gallery nine5 by Allan M. Jalon

Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann says her real start as an artist came when she got a critical stab from the renowned 1950s painter Grace Hartigan.

It was, Mann recalls, probably her first formal critique in graduate school, at the Maryland Institute College of Art, where Hartigan was a guiding figure as administrator and artist... read more >

 

The Colour of Laughter - Erik Matiny

October 21, 2013

The Colour of Laughter

by Erik Matiny

X

About Erik Martiny

Fjords Reviews - Erik Martiny Erik Martiny's reviews have appeared in London Magazine and The Times Literary Supplement. He lives in France.

Born in 1962 in Daqing, China, Yue Minjun studied art at the Normal University in Hebei Province. After having joined the (now no longer existing) Yuan Ming Yuan community of artists outside Beijing in the early 1990s... read more >

 

Art Paris Art Fair 2013 Review

July 1, 2013

Art Paris Art Fair 2013 Review

by Erik Matiny

X

About Erik Martiny

Fjords Reviews - Erik Martiny Erik Martiny's reviews have appeared in London Magazine and The Times Literary Supplement. He lives in France.

This year's contemporary art fair in Paris held March 28-31 displayed a dizzying array of 144 of the world's high-quality galleries. If just over half of the galleries present were Paris-based, there were others from 20 countries including Europe, China, the United Arab Emirates, Lebanon and last but not least Russia since it was the honoured guest... read more >

 

Topography of Destruction Kemper Museum

March 19, 2013

Topography of Destruction Kemper Museum

by Kayti Doolitle

X

About Kayti Doolitle

Fjords Reviews -  Kayti Doolitle Kayti Doolitle graduated from Missouri State University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and a minor in Creative Writing. She is the Art and Film Reviewer for Fjords Review. Kayti is writing an anthology of essays about the sex industry in countries around the world, while living in South Korea.

"The Map as Art," group show at The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art includes artists inspired by the origins, intentions, and purposes of maps. Artist Joyce Kozloff's installation is like a walk-in, inside-out globe. The outside of the structure is comprised of wooden panels and the inside is lined with twenty-four maps of countries bombed by the United States... read more >

 

Erothanatos

February 11, 2013

Erothanatos

by Erik Matiny

X

About Erik Martiny

Fjords Reviews - Erik Martiny Erik Martiny's reviews have appeared in London Magazine and The Times Literary Supplement. He lives in France.

If you come to this exhibition expecting to see only works of art that illustrate the social historian's view that art produced in times of war is an expression of its horror, then you are in for a surprise. Of course, the exhibition showcases the expected kinds of works exuding period angst: Georges Rouault's Homo Homini Lupus ... read more >

 

Hopper the Frenchie

November 29, 2012

Hopper the Frenchie

by Erik Matiny

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About Erik Martiny

Fjords Reviews - Erik Martiny Erik Martiny's reviews have appeared in London Magazine and The Times Literary Supplement. He lives in France.

Erected for the 1900 Exposition Universelle in an attempt to equal the sensation produced by the Eiffel Tower (built for the Universal Exhibition of 1889), the Grand Palais is a sumptuous architectural treat and it's a good thing too as it allows the viewer a measure of respite from the two-to-three-hour wait in the exhibition queue. No one complains about this as Hopper is the must-see show on at the moment in Paris... read more >

 

The Louvre Relocates to Africa

November 8, 2012

The Louvre Relocates to Africa

by Erik Matiny

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About Erik Martiny

Fjords Reviews - Erik Martiny Erik Martiny's reviews have appeared in London Magazine and The Times Literary Supplement. He lives in France.

"Like Norman Rockwell's paintings they look better in reproduction than in reality." This is a line taken from the New York Times review of Kehinde Wiley but it's hard to see how such a statement can be true of any work of art, and Wiley's is no exception - far from it. Even Gustav Klimt's tiny painting "Die Musik" in Munich's Neue Pinakothek ... read more >

 

A French Priest, Tears and Fire: The Art of Jean-Michel Othoniel

May 26, 2012

A French Priest, Tears and Fire: The Art of Jean-Michel Othoniel

by Kayti Doolitle

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About Kayti Doolitle

Fjords Reviews -  Kayti Doolitle Kayti Doolitle graduated from Missouri State University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and a minor in Creative Writing. She is the Art and Film Reviewer for Fjords Review. Kayti is writing an anthology of essays about the sex industry in countries around the world, while living in South Korea.

Used matches line the bottom of Jean-Michel Othoniel's Wishing Wall, for his My Way exhibition at the Plateau Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, South Korea. The large-scale wall is covered in one of Othoniel's precious metamorphic mediums: phosphorous... read more >

 

North Korean Defector's U.S. Art Premiere

February 17, 2012

North Korean Defector's U.S. Art Premiere

by Kayti Doolitle

X

About Kayti Doolitle

Fjords Reviews -  Kayti Doolitle Kayti Doolitle graduated from Missouri State University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and a minor in Creative Writing. She is the Art and Film Reviewer for Fjords Review. Kayti is writing an anthology of essays about the sex industry in countries around the world, while living in South Korea.

Song Byeok was a propaganda artist who escaped from North Korea through China and arrived in South Korea in 2002.

Song Byeok believed in North Korea's messages until famine struck in the 1990s. As his loved ones starved to death, Byeok and his father resorted to crossing the flooded Tumen River to China in a desperate search for food... read more >